Last edited by Tezragore
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Domesday Havering found in the catalog.

Domesday Havering

Drury, John

Domesday Havering

theLondon Borough of Havering in the eleventh century as described in the Domesday Book of 1086

by Drury, John

  • 237 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Farthings in Upminster .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Bibliography: p87.

StatementJohn Drury.
The Physical Object
Paginationvii,87p. :
Number of Pages87
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15351599M
ISBN 100951549502
OCLC/WorldCa22891327

The Victoria history of the county of Essex. [Edited by H. Arthur Doubleday and William Page] Item Preview. The manor of Havering The custom on wool The custom on wine burgesses cause charter chattels city of London cloth clothiers command common corn Council court custom defect of rent demesne divers Domesday Book Earl Edmund England escheator feast gild merchant granted hath heirs Henry hereafter hold Jews journeymen.

Cranham is recorded in the Domesday Book of as comprising two manors. The smaller was in the north of the parish, and called Craohv and in as Craweno. It means 'spur of land frequented by crows' and is formed from the Old English 'crāwe' and 'hōh'. The larger was the Anglo-Saxon manor of Ockendon (Wochenduna)Powell, W.R. (Edr.) (). Parishes: Cranham, A History of the County of. Domesday Book 19th century Abbey ancient Anglo-Saxon charter Barnet Bexley borough Brent Bridge Bromley Brook built Camden Chingford church City Cross Croydon developed district du¯n Ealing earlier name early East eModE Enfield English personal name family called Farm farmstead or estate folk etymology ford Fulham Gardens gate gives name.

The placename Upminster is first recorded in as Upmynstre and is recorded in the Domesday Book as Upmunstra. It is formed from Old English upp and mynster, meaning the large church on high high ground of the parish church being in relation to the valley of the River Ingrebourne and the Upminster Bridge over the river shares the name. An alternative explanation suggests the. - Romford, Noak Hill, Havering See more ideas about Havering, Stamping ground, Essex pins.


Share this book
You might also like
Riding for everybody.

Riding for everybody.

The throat

The throat

Computer systems for the Veterans Administration and procurement practices

Computer systems for the Veterans Administration and procurement practices

University of Washington teacher assessment system

University of Washington teacher assessment system

approach to measuring consistency of preference vector derivations using least square distance.

approach to measuring consistency of preference vector derivations using least square distance.

literary background of the New Testament

literary background of the New Testament

This is the life

This is the life

On Top of Spaghetti

On Top of Spaghetti

Techniques of the great masters of art.

Techniques of the great masters of art.

Service learning

Service learning

Remarks on the foundations of mathematics

Remarks on the foundations of mathematics

Mineral working in Avon local plan

Mineral working in Avon local plan

Domesday Havering by Drury, John Download PDF EPUB FB2

Havering [atte Bower] was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Becontree and the county of Essex. It had a recorded population of 45 households inputting it in the largest 20% of settlements recorded in Domesday, and is listed under 2 owners in Domesday Book.

Chadwell Heath itself was uninhabited royal forest in the southern part of the manor of Havering-atte-Bower. In Domesday Havering book Havering we learn that the manor measured 10 hides at acres a hide including woodland for pigs, meadow, forest, and marshland. The population consisted of 40 villagers, 41 smallholders, 6 slaves, and 3 freemen.

Domesday Book, the original record or summary of William I’s survey of England. By contemporaries the whole operation was known as “the description of England,” but the popular name Domesday—i.e., “doomsday,” when men face the record from which there is no. The county of Essex in Domesday Book.

Havering [atte Bower] Becontree: 45 [Great and Little] Warley: Chafford: Rettendon: Chelmsford: 45 [Little] Sampford: Freshwell: Panfield: Domesday data created by Professor J.J.N. Palmer and team. History Toponomy. The name Havering is recorded in the Domesday Book as "Haueringas" and means 'the settlement of the family or followers of a man called Hæfer', an ancient folk name.

From the 13th century the suffix -atte-Bower was added and means 'at the royal residence'. Havering and Havering-atte-Bower continue to be used as the names of a London borough and a small settlement Status: Royal manor (11th century–).

7. Answer: Havering. What we now know as Havering was recorded in the Domesday Book as Haueringas, named after a man who went by Haefer. Answer: Haringey.

Haringey takes its name from Haeringes-hege, the settlement belonging to a Saxon chief called Haering. Obviously. Answer: Kensington and Chelsea. This one was easy. Havering was first recorded in the Domesday book as Hauringas, meaning the followers of a man named Haefer. More intriguingly, local legend links Havering palace to the last Anglo-Saxon King, Edward the confessor.

According to myth Edward’s ring, which he had given to St. John the Evangelist, magically reappeared to him while he was in the. Deppedana: Ranulfvines, 3 beehives.

7 cobs, 2 foals, sheep, pigs. Places in the Domesday Book associated with the name Earl Harold. Havering [atte Bower], Becontree, Essex Heasley, Bowcombe, Hampshire Heddington, Calne, Wiltshire Helston, Winnianton Domesday data created by Professor J.J.N. Palmer and team. The following pages include Domesday place-names and landowners, and beneath some are links to websites containing the local history of that place.

If you have a local history site that you would like to be included on these pages please get in touch via the Contact page. The Domesday Book was a record of the survey of England carried out in by William the Conqueror in order to assess taxes and find out other details of the country he conquered 20 years earlier.

The book is preserved in two volumes at the Public Record Office, London, and its name comes from the belief that its judgement was as final as. The manor of Havering inwhen the Domesday Book was compiled, consisted of the present area of Romford, Hornchurch, Collier Row, Harold Wood, and Harold Hill and Havering-atte-Bower.

The manor took the shape of a wedge, with the blunt end centred on Have ring-atte-Bower and decreasing in width, with the thin end of the wedge finishing at.

In when the Domesday book was completed, Peter was sheriff of the counties of Essex and Hertfordshire and he farmed the boroughs of Havering and Hertford.

Although Peter de Valognes made his caput in Benington in Hertfordshire, his most valuable lands were in Norfolk, the latter being a later grant at the forfeiture of Ralph de Guader. Havering-atte-Bower was first recorded as such, or more accurately as Hauering atte Bower, infrom the Old English personal name Haefer, and ingas, meaning settlement, and the Middle English bour, meaning bower, or royal residence (Havering was first recorded as Haueringas in the “Domesday Book” of ).

It essentially remains to. Whether the Confessor ever did spend much time at Havering can not be ascertained, even though Hughson quotes the Domesday Book as marking Havering as a feudum of the king. The earliest known record of Edward staying at Havering comes from John Hardyng’s chronicle ofwhere he states that Havering was the setting for the legend of St.

In the second place, nothing in Domesday Book would indicate that Edward held, on the day he was alive and dead, the manors of Havering, Hatfield Regis, Newport, or Writtle, in Essex, or Hitchin, in Hertfordshire, or King's Ripton, in Huntingdon-shire.

But they are listed under Terra Regis (except King's Ripton), and were never. Havering-atte-Bower är en by i Havering [1] i Storlondon i England. Byn nämndes i Domedagsboken (Domesday Book) åroch kallades då Hauelingas/Haueringas.

[2] Referenser Externa länkar. British History Online. Haverhill in Domesday Book. Arable land was recorded in different units, including: Ploughlands, carucates, hides: A ploughland (terra carucis or carucata) was the area that could be ploughed by eight oxen in a lly around acres, though the area varied depending on the quality of the land.

Havering-atte-Bower is a village and outlying settlement of Greater London, is located in the far north of the London Borough of Havering, on the border with Essex, and is 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Charing was one of three former parishes whose area comprised the historic Royal Liberty of Havering.

Wennington är en by i Havering [1] i Storlondon i England. Byn nämndes i Domedagsboken (Domesday Book) åroch kallades då Wemtuna. [2] Referenser Externa länkar. British History Online. Domesday Book or the Great Survey of England: Facsimile of the Part relating to Essex, W.R.

Powell (ed.), A History of the County of Essex,part of the Victoria History of the Counties of England, O.U.P., (re. royal manor of Havering). *J.H. Round, "Introduction to the Essex Domesday", and "Text of the Essex Domesday".Domesday carefully records the owners of each manor (estate) inas these were the people liable for tax.

All land was ultimately owned by the Crown, but held by lords, who provided military resources or tax in return. Tenant-in-chief in The main landholders listed in Domesday Book.

Either King William himself, or one of around 1,The name Havering is recorded in the Domesday Book as "Haueringas" and means 'the settlement of the family or followers of a man called Hæfer', an ancient folk name.

[2] From the 13th century the suffix -atte-Bower was added and means 'at the royal residence'. [2].